archiemcphee:

These beautiful moths and butterflies look like they’re ready to flutter up and away, but they won’t be doing so because they’re wonderful textile sculptures painstakingly created by North Carolina-based artist Yumi Okita. She sews, embroiders and stitches all sorts of multi-colored fabrics to create these oversized insects, which measure nearly a foot wide. She also adds painted details along with feathers and artificial fur. With great care Okita has achieved an awesome balance between astonishing realism and fanciful invention.

Click here to view more of Yumi Okita’s gorgeous textile insect sculptures.

[via Colossal and Demilked]

(via najmetender)

littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Mystical World Of Mushrooms Captured In Photos

Most people consider mushrooms to be the small, ugly cousins of the plant kingdom, but theirs is  surprisingly beautiful and wonderful world waiting to be explored. These beautiful mushrooms, captured by enthusiastic nature photographers, are a far cry from the ones you find in the woods or your local grocery store.

Most mushrooms, as we know them, are actually just the reproductive structure of the fungus they belong to – their fungal networks expand far further underground, and some fungi don’t even sprout the sort of mushrooms that we’re used to seeing. In fact, depending on your definition of “organism,” the largest living organism in the world is a fungus – there’s a honey mushroom colony in Oregon that occupies about 2,000 acres of land! ( Bored Panda )

(via p-h-a-n-t-a-om)

kiriutar:

winkbooks:

Dead Inside: Do Not Enter — Notes from the Zombie Apocalypse

Dead Inside: Do Not Enter
by Lost Zombies
Chronicle
2011, 160 pages, 8 x 10 x 0.5 inches
$15 Buy a copy on Amazon

Some of my favorite things about zombie movies are the details of the changed world. The dead grass, broken windows, toppled telephone poles, abandoned cars with missing wheels and trunks left open, boarded-up buildings, spent ammo shells, and other signs of struggle and desperation serve to create a fascinatingly creepy environment.

And that’s why I like Dead Inside: Do Not Enter so much. The book consists entirely of letters, hand-written warnings, and pages torn from journal entries that were written during the zombie pandemic. The notes are on matchbooks, napkins, photographs, advertisements, shopping lists, road maps, scraps of cardboard, and gum wrappers. Some of the notes are written with pen and pencil, others are written with lipstick, burnt wood, crayons, and blood.

The messages of the notes themselves tell the tale of the rise of the zombie pandemic, from tentative, joking questions about a “really bad flu,” escalating to confused panic, and later to grim acceptance of the new reality that the survivors now must live in.

In the introduction to Dead Inside, we learn that these notes had been found in a Dora the Explorer backpack. The first note presented in the book was written by the man who killed the owner of the backpack, a girl who was about 10 years old and had been bitten by a zombie (but had not yet turned into one). The man wrote “I opened her backpack and found all these notes and letters. This stuff is poisonous. No one in their right mind should read it. Reading this is like looking into the sun.” – Mark Frauenfelder

September 16, 2014

I want to label this a trigger of some kind, because all of a sudden, my world dimmed, my heart started pounding, and I want to sob. Holy sh*t, that’s powerful.

(via tea-sipping-zombie)

asylum-art:

Parallel Worlds by Michał Karcz

500px| Facebookon | deviantART| on Behance

Some artists get to the point when their usual medium or technique starts to limit their visions. This is exactly what happened to a Polish artist Michal Karcz who found that painting and the ordinary dark room photography techniques didn’t allow him to fully realize his potential.

Born in 1977 in Warsaw, the graduate of the High School of the Arts was first passionate about painting. However, in the early 90′s, he became drawn to photography only to realize that the dark-room techniques alone were almost as limiting as the paintbrush and canvas. Luckily, the developing technology allowed him to combine the two with the help of some digital tools

(via madjesters1)

word-stuck:

“We are, as a species, addicted to story. Even when the body goes to sleep, the mind stays up all night, telling itself stories.” ― Jonathan Gottschall, The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human

word-stuck:

“We are, as a species, addicted to story. Even when the body goes to sleep, the mind stays up all night, telling itself stories.” ― Jonathan Gottschall, The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human

gothiccharmschool:

taraljc:

maudelynn:

The Haunted Dollhouse~ 

via http://www.otterine.com

(I want this so very much) 

I WANT THIS. I WANT A 1:6 SCALE VERSION OF THIS. I DON’T NEED A SPARE ROOM, IT CAN JUST BE THIS INSTEAD.

Yessss. I want this.

I also want a Jilli-sized version of it to live in.

(via typette)

Just a blog, to put stuff in, or something like that.

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